Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard thanks IOC before competingAssociated Presson July 30, 2021 at 4:36 pm

TOKYO — Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard is in Japan for the Tokyo Games and thanked the International Olympic Committee on Friday for helping to make it possible for her to compete.

Hubbard has been a focus for support and criticism since qualifying for the Tokyo Olympics. She is a medal contender in the women’s over-87-kilogram weightlifting category on Monday.

“The Olympic Games are a global celebration of our hopes, our ideals and our values. I commend the IOC for its commitment to making sport inclusive and accessible,” Hubbard said in comments provided by the New Zealand Olympic Committee.

“Laurel has just arrived a couple of days ago. I just bumped into her at lunch and we understand that she’s comfortable,” NZOC secretary-general Kereyn Smith said. “She’s getting ready. She well understands the size of the stage and is very grateful to be able to compete in this environment.”

The IOC in 2015 drew up a set of recommendations for including transgender athletes. Many sports bodies including the International Weightlifting Federation have implemented similar policies based on the IOC recommendations. Different sports are allowed to set their own specific policies.

The IOC signaled it will release a new “framework” for transgender athletes’ eligibility, taking into account newer scientific studies. That will form a basis for sports to draw up their own updated policies.

IOC medical director Richard Budgett said the organization was funding research into the effects of transitioning. Current IOC guidelines require athletes to demonstrate low testosterone levels for 12 months before a first competition.

“We funded some of those (studies) based particularly importantly on individuals who are transgender and seeing what the effect of transitioning actually has on their performance, because that’s what we really need to know,” Budgett said.

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Thanks, Rizz….see ya on the other sideon July 30, 2021 at 3:54 pm

I’ve Got The Hippy Shakes

Thanks, Rizz….see ya on the other side

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New Bulls guard Ayo Dosunmu likes his ‘Chance’ to prove people wrongJoe Cowleyon July 30, 2021 at 2:55 pm

It’s not a real party until Chance the Rapper arrives.

Of the 60 players drafted into the NBA on Thursday night, not many could make that bold statement and mean it.

Ayo Dosunmu could.

“After one of my games my junior year [at Illinois] he reached out to me,” Dosunmu said of his relationship with the Chicago-born rapper. “He just said he was proud of me and that I [should] continue to put on for the city, and when I sent out the invitations for my draft party I told him to slide by. He came and he showed support. He was there, polite … yeah, that’s my guy.”

For that reason alone, Dosunmu — a former standout at Morgan Park High School — should be considered one of the bigger winners to come out of the 2021 draft. Killer draft party, hometown kid drafted in the second round by the hometown-team Bulls with the only pick they had on the night. The perfect Hollywood script.

One problem: The combination guard felt like he was a first-round talent and should have gone higher than 38th overall.

“I know I’m a first-round talent,” Dosunmu said. “But you can’t [know] what God has planned for you. And God wanted me to play for my city. So that’s what I’m going to do. I’m embracing it.”

Did the Bulls add a game-changer in the 6-foot-4 Dosunmu? Likely not. He’s a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none player, who could immediately give the Bulls a versatile backcourt option off the bench. There is a ceiling to change that trajectory, but will only come with a lot of hard work and opportunity.

The Bulls fan base — which has a history of getting over-excited about hometown players making good by reaching the Association — walked out of the draft thumping its chest and feeling like winners, but the Bulls ticket office should have been the ones really smiling.

A ridiculously loyal fan base now has another reason to blindly throw money at a product that hasn’t seen the postseason since 2017.

The real winners from Thursday’s draft:

1. “Houston … you no longer have a problem” — James Harden’s departure seemed to leave the franchise spiraling last season, but nothing like a loaded draft class for a quick fix. The Rockets grabbed electric scorer Jalen Green with the No. 2 overall pick, then added three high-upside players to go with him in Alperen Sengun, Usman Garuba and Josh Christopher.

2. Golden options — The Warriors had two lottery picks to play with, and the expectation was they could trade one or both to try and add proven veteran talent. That could still happen, as they hit pay dirt in landing small forward Jonathan Kuminga at No. 7 and then Moses Moody at No. 14, but this is a front office that is simply reloading rather than rebuilding.

3. A bit defensive — Are the Orlando Magic suddenly a playoff threat? Not even close. But it was Christmas in July for the franchise, as Jalen Suggs slid a spot to No. 5. With the No. 8 pick they received from the Bulls in the Nikola Vucevic deal, they then grabbed versatile forward Franz Wagner. Two great defenders to go along with a roster that currently has defensive-minded players like Gary Harris and Wendell Carter Jr.

4. “De-Troit Basketball …” — Joakim Noah made his feelings about Cleveland very clear years ago, insisting he’s never heard anyone say “I’m going to Cleveland on vacation.” The same could be said about Detroit. That’s what made the Cade Cunningham selection so refreshing. The No. 1 overall pick wanted to be a Piston, and was embracing the Detroit underdog role in every interview. He has the talent and mindset to put a dismal franchise back on an NBA radar they haven’t appeared on since 2004.

5. Hot-lanta –The Hawks have already arrived on the playoff scene, and then added two big-swing prospects in Jalen Johnson and Sharife Cooper. If Cooper — picked at No. 48 — does what he’s capable of at point guard, the Bulls could be kicking themselves for passing on him years from now.

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Broadway to require vaccinations, masks for audiences at all showsAssociated Presson July 30, 2021 at 3:37 pm

NEW YORK — COVID-19 vaccinations and masks will be required for all Broadway audience members when theaters reopen in the coming weeks, theater operators announced Friday.

Audience members will have to wear face coverings and show proof they are fully vaccinated when they enter the theaters, the Broadway League said in a news release.

There will be exceptions to the vaccine rule for children under 12, who are not yet eligible for any of the approved shots, and for people with a medical condition or religious belief that prevents vaccination, the theater operators said. Those individuals will need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test.

“As vaccination has proven the most effective way to stay healthy and reduce transmission, I’m pleased that the theatre owners have decided to implement these collective safeguards at all our Broadway houses,” Broadway League President Charlotte St. Martin said.

Vaccinations will also be required for all performers, crew members and theater employees, the league said.

Bruce Springsteen’s one-man show is the only performance currently running on Broadway.

Antoinette Chinonye Nwandu’s “Pass Over” is set to open Wednesday at the August Wilson Theatre. Most other theaters will open in September or October after being shuttered since the coronavirus pandemic hit in March 2020.

Ticket holders for performances scheduled through Oct. 31 will be notified of the vaccination policy, Broadway League officials said. For performances in November 2021 and beyond, the theater operators will review the policy and made changes if science dictates, they said.

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Five Peaceful Chicagoland HomesWhet Moseron July 30, 2021 at 3:00 pm

It’s been hot and muggy, people are stressed, downtown is crammed with Lollapalooza attendees, and we’ve been dealing with powerful storms and wildfire haze. We’re going into the dog days of summer, the slog until the period when it’s nice before it starts to get cold again.

So if you’re going to daydream about real estate, you might as well look for something calming: shade to keep outside as tolerable as possible, calming places to be inside when it’s not (like the rare indoor pool). And there are some surprisingly affordable options for some unique houses—an indoor pool under $600,000, and a cabin with a horse barn and corral for under $500,000 (though there’s about as much room for the horses as for the owners). Step inside.

It’s Brutalist, and it’s curvy, and it’s got a two-story indoor pool with a water slide, and it’s got a bar in the living room under the two-story atrium, a living room which is connected to the family room (which has a built-in curved sofa) by a curved open fireplace. The three-story spiral staircase (of course) leads up to the bedrooms; the master bed is surrounded by about 120 degrees of windows, and is nestled into a curvy set dresser which also serves as a headboard (and, uh, has a circular mirrored ceiling above it). All this—four beds, four baths—for less than $600,000. It’s sold as-is, and it does have concrete and an indoor pool so maintenance could run more than something a bit more conservative in its price range, but… look.

It’s a lot of look. I don’t even know what to call the style it is in—Corporate Retreat Ranch? The interior detailing is a bit dry for a house of this price, but part of that interior includes that thing on the right, described as a “four season lookout tower-gazebo.” It’s sort of like a sunroom crossed with a silo? It’s really cool. If that’s too round, there’s another sunroom just off the living room. There’s a library with a cozy sit-in bay window nook, tons of porch, a master bath with a fireplace, and even two secret doors, making up for the sort of plain main rooms with a lot of delightful surprises.

If you can’t decide between midcentury modernism and a woodland estate, this is a chance to have both. This four-acre property has two houses, plus a lower-level apartment in the main house, all stretching across nearly 9,000 square feet of living space. As you can probably guess from the landscaping—which, under the chaos, is pretty lovely—it needs work. But it retains a lot of its 1960s style, like its extensive parquet floors, stone wall with fireplace, and the clock built into the oven hood. The extensive property backs up to a forest preserve, or you can just admire the tree inside the house.

This postmodern ranch has major hotel lobby vibes, and I say that with the highest of praise. The foyer has a pond with trees, next to the glass-enclosed spiral staircase, with interior windows looking out onto the indoor pool. The floor, naturally, is black stone. A lofted office area looks down upon your sleek Xanadu. As an alternative to the pool, there’s a sunroom with a hot tub and fireplace, the second-sleekest in the house after the corner fireplace in the immense, light-filled main bedroom. For a break from all that, some of the rooms are downright conventional ranch living space, with exposed beams and floor-to-ceiling windows.

The good news: you can have horses (up to three), in a big, attractive barn, for under $500,000. There’s also a huge garage for the huge truck you’ll need to pull the horse trailer. The bad news: there’s 1,000 square feet for people: three beds, one bath, small living room, combo kitchen-dining room. It’s a squeeze, nothing fancy, but it’s cute. You do get a lot of yard, a pond, and a corral off the barn. And it’s right across the street from a huge string of Cook County Forest Preserves: Tampier Slough, Cap Sauers, Cherry Hill Woods, out to the Cal Sag Channel, where the preserves continue all the way out to Willow Springs. It’s not much house, but it’s a lot for the price.

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Chicago Foreclosure Activity Not Budging Muchon July 30, 2021 at 3:17 pm

Getting Real

Chicago Foreclosure Activity Not Budging Much

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Towering Pilsen mural emphasizes neighborhood’s Mexican culture and pushes back against forces of gentrificationLu Calzadaon July 30, 2021 at 2:00 pm

After growing up in and around Pilsen, musician Maya Zazhil Fernandez will now be a semi-permanent fixture in the neighborhood — albeit a two-dimensional one.

Fernandez and her traditional Mexican music group, called Jarochicanos, are among 46 locals featured on a 4,000-square-foot mural completed earlier this year at 1113 W. 18th St. entitled “Somos Pilsen,” or “We Are Pilsen.”

Beyond conveying images of real people connected to the largely Mexican American community, the painting is intended to be a statement about the gentrification that’s been displacing some long-time residents and businesses because of rising rents.

“Pilsen’s gone through some pretty monumental changes,” says Pablo Serrano, a Pilsen artist who with Mateo Zapata completed the mural on the exterior of the Carnitas Don Pedro restaurant on Jan. 6. “But the art’s always been there — and the struggle and the need to express the cultural identity of a Mexican immigrant community like Pilsen.”

Jan. 6 is the same day that mobs of Donald Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol — which Zapata noted was an ironic coincidence.

“We’re talking about trying to face the challenges of gentrification and displacement of Brown people,” Zapata says. “And then you have this massive show of force that represents white supremacy on Capitol Hill.”

The artists ended up including the shared date on the mural.

Maya Zazhil Fernandez was included in the Pilsen mural with her music group, Jarochicanos.
Maya Zazhil Fernandez was included in the Pilsen mural with her music group, Jarochicanos.
Provided

Fernandez, who’s of Mexican and Peruvian descent and still lives in Pilsen, was included in the center of the painting. Her music group, formed in 2008, has been giving free music workshops for more than a decade as well as performing at neighborhood events. She says her inclusion in the mural helps recognize the role of traditional music in Pilsen.

“For us it’s not so much about the individual or us individually being recognized, it’s about our work and the work that we do being seen as something that’s a part of the community,” says Fernandez, 26. “It’s a really humbling thing.”

There’s also a map of Latin America on the mural along with one of the American South. Serrano, 41, says he chose to include these to represent the migration of Black Americans and Latin Americans.

Pablo Serrano, one of the artists who created “Somos Pilsen,” says he hopes residents can see themselves in the mural.
Mateo Zapata

Gentrification — when more affluent people and businesses move into an area and displace lower-income residents — has been a hot topic in the neighborhood as more than 14,000 Latino residents have relocated since 2000, according to published reports.

With images of regular people — of varying races, the artists note — Zapata sees the mural as a form of resistance to the forces changing the neighborhood.

Displacement has been a theme through Zapata’s life as he was born in Colombia after his mother was previously exiled from Chile when it was under a dictatorship.

Zapata, 37, has also felt the effects of Pilsen’s gentrification, as he’s been forced to move further and further west over the last decade or so because of increasing rents to the east. Many friends and neighbors have had similar experiences, he says.

Mateo Zapata, one of the mural's artists, has experienced the effects of gentrification through his rising rent.
Mateo Zapata, one of the mural’s artists, has experienced the effects of gentrification through his rising rent.
Provided

A phoenix takes up a large area of the mural and stands for resilience and “something that cannot be destroyed,” according to Zapata.

He’s talking here about history — that no matter what ultimately happens in Pilsen, its rich history can’t be erased.

The individuals included in the mural were people known by Zapata, Serrano or the Duarte family who own the building the mural is on and the attached restaurant. Those on the mural who are still alive then had their photos taken by one of the artists to use as a reference.

The mural, measuring 88 feet wide and 46 feet tall at its highest point, took at least 25 gallons of paint and over half a year to complete, done completely by paintbrush. Discussions between the artists and restaurant owners began in summer 2020, with the painting beginning in the early fall.

Magdalena Castaneda, 46, is one of the owners of the restaurant that was originally opened by her father in 1981 and says she loves how the mural highlights the roots of the neighborhood and those who worked to make it what it is today. Her mother, Magdalena Duarte, along with her father and the restaurant’s namesake, Pedro Duarte, are both pictured on the mural.

The faces of the Pilsen mural belong to neighborhood figures who are almost all still alive.
The faces of the Pilsen mural belong to neighborhood figures who are almost all still alive.
Provided

Serrano says what he enjoyed about working on the mural was seeing people who didn’t know each other meet at its unveiling, which was one of the first in-person events he did since the pandemic began.

“The mural was an opportunity to consciously connect people that were not connected but were one degree apart or two, but that love Pilsen, love Chicago,” he says.

Click on the map below for a selection of Chicago-area murals

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New Bulls guard Ayo Dosunmu likes his ‘Chance’ to prove people wrongJoe Cowleyon July 30, 2021 at 2:02 pm

It’s not a real party until Chance the Rapper arrives.

Of the 60 players drafted into the NBA on Thursday night, not many could make that bold statement and mean it.

Ayo Dosunmu could.

“After one of my games my junior year [at Illinois] he reached out to me,” Dosunmu said of his relationship with the Chicago-born rapper. “He just said he was proud of me and that I [should] continue to put on for the city, and when I sent out the invitations for my draft party I told him to slide by. He came and he showed support. He was there, polite … yeah, that’s my guy.”

For that reason alone, Dosunmu — a former standout at Morgan Park High School — should be considered one of the bigger winners to come out of the 2021 draft. Killer draft party, hometown kid drafted in the second round by the hometown-team Bulls with the only pick they had on the night. The perfect Hollywood script.

One problem: The combination guard felt like he was a first-round talent and should have gone higher than 38th overall.

“I know I’m a first-round talent,” Dosunmu said. “But you can’t [know] what God has planned for you. And God wanted me to play for my city. So that’s what I’m going to do. I’m embracing it.”

Did the Bulls add a game-changer in the 6-foot-4 Dosunmu? Likely not. He’s a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none player, who could immediately give the Bulls a versatile backcourt option off the bench. There is a ceiling to change that trajectory, but will only come with a lot of hard work and opportunity.

The Bulls fan base — which has a history of getting over-excited about hometown players making good by reaching the Association — walked out of the draft thumping its chest and feeling like winners, but the Bulls ticket office should have been the ones really smiling.

A ridiculously loyal fan base now has another reason to blindly throw money at a product that hasn’t seen the postseason since 2017.

The real winners from Thursday’s draft:

1. “Houston … you no longer have a problem” — James Harden’s departure seemed to leave the franchise spiraling last season, but nothing like a loaded draft class for a quick fix. The Rockets grabbed electric scorer Jalen Green with the No. 2 overall pick, then added three high-upside players to go with him in Alperen Sengun, Usman Garuba and Josh Christopher.

2. Golden options — The Warriors had two lottery picks to play with, and the expectation was they could trade one or both to try and add proven veteran talent. That could still happen, as they hit pay dirt in landing small forward Jonathan Kuminga at No. 7 and then Moses Moody at No. 14, but this is a front office that is simply reloading rather than rebuilding.

3. A bit defensive — Are the Orlando Magic suddenly a playoff threat? Not even close. But it was Christmas in July for the franchise, as Jalen Suggs slid a spot to No. 5. With the No. 8 pick they received from the Bulls in the Nikola Vucevic deal, they then grabbed versatile forward Franz Wagner. Two great defenders to go along with a roster that currently has defensive-minded players like Gary Harris and Wendell Carter Jr.

4. “De-Troit Basketball …” — Joakim Noah made his feelings about Cleveland very clear years ago, insisting he’s never heard anyone say “I’m going to Cleveland on vacation.” The same could be said about Detroit. That’s what made the Cade Cunningham selection so refreshing. The No. 1 overall pick wanted to be a Piston, and was embracing the Detroit underdog role in every interview. He has the talent and mindset to put a dismal franchise back on an NBA radar they haven’t appeared on since 2004.

5. Hot-lanta –The Hawks have already arrived on the playoff scene, and then added two big-swing prospects in Jalen Johnson and Sharife Cooper. If Cooper — picked at No. 48 — does what he’s capable of at point guard, the Bulls could be kicking themselves for passing on him years from now.

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Of ground squirrels and chipmunks: Putting their place and status in Illinois in perspectiveDale Bowmanon July 30, 2021 at 2:07 pm

Bruce Nathanson asked a question that made me scamper around to dig up an answer.

“I live in the northern suburbs–I have never seen more rabbits,” he emailed. “The good news is that there are no chipmunks this year. Normally we are overrun with chipmunks. Please ask your experts what happened to the chipmunks.”

Illinois State Biologist Eric Schauber suggested I reach out to Robert Schooley, head of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois.

I broadened Nathanson’s question out to be chipmunks and ground squirrels. Ground squirrels caught my eye last spring during the lockdown period for the pandemic when I saw a 13-lined ground squirrel flitting between our flower and vegetable pots on our small back patio.

First some refining of the definitions seemed important.

“Strictly speaking, we just have Franklin’s ground squirrels and thirteen-lined ground squirrels,” Schooley emailed. “More broadly, if you group `ground squirrels’ versus `tree squirrels,’ then the ground squirrels include eastern chipmunks and woodchucks.”

I was surprised to find woodchucks (groundhogs) lumped with chipmunks. Growing up, I assumed groundhogs were related to bears because they look similar. By the way, Illinois has four species of tree squirrels: fox, eastern gray, red and southern flying.

As to how our two ground squirrels are doing, Schooley broke it down like this, “Franklin’s ground squirrel is state listed as a Threatened species in Illinois. They are also an Endangered species in Indiana and a Species of Concern in other Midwest states. They have suffered from the tremendous loss and fragmentation of tallgrass prairies and now occur in small patches of grasslands including along roadsides and railroads. However, research by a former PhD student of mine, Dr. Jenny Duggan, showed that Franklin’s in Illinois were not necessarily a prairie obligate species. For instance, they also occur in smooth brome grasslands but only if they are not mowed regularly.

“Thirteen-lined ground squirrels seem to be doing fine. Unlike Franklin’s, they inhabit mowed areas including roadsides, lawns, parks, and such.”

So the 13-lined ground squirrel I had spotted last spring was not that unusual.

As to chipmunks, Schooley emailed, “I am not aware of any recent monitoring of chipmunks in Illinois. But in general, they occur throughout most of the state and are not a species of concern.”

Nathanson’s question made me wonder if there was a natural cycle of ups and downs in populations. I was thinking of the nine- or 10-year population cycles of ruffed grouse.

But Schooley emailed, “To my knowledge, grounds squirrels and chipmunks do not have regular population fluctuations (aka population cycles) like voles do in some regions where they might irrupt every four years. But abundances of ground squirrels and chipmunks can vary a lot from year-to-year, probably due to weather affecting their food resources.”

Because it helps people to take conservation seriously, I asked what role they play in the ecosystem.

“Chipmunks and ground squirrels are prey for many predators, so they are an important part of food webs,” Schooley explained. “Their burrows provide microhabitat for other species of vertebrates and invertebrates. Also, their burrowing activity can help with soil aeration and water infiltration.”

Many of our lesser known animals seem to be impacted by the modern world in an unfavorable way, so I asked if any ground squirrels disappeared in the last couple hundred years?

“I do not think so in the United States,” Schooley emailed. “There currently is one federally endangered ground squirrel that is in danger of going extinct–the northern Idaho ground squirrel.”

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Everything you need to know about Lollapalooza 2021Satchel Priceon July 30, 2021 at 2:18 pm

Lollapalooza officially returned to Grant Park this week for four days of music and good times despite concerns about how bringing together over 100,000 people each day will affect the ongoing pandemic.

The festival, which opened Thursday with vaccination or proof of a negative COVID-19 test required for entry, represents the largest public event to date held in Chicago since the emergence of the coronavirus last March. Despite worries over the virus’ Delta variant and rising caseloads nationally, the show will go on this weekend.

Huge acts are in town luring giant crowds to the park, including Miley Cyrus, Foo Fighters, Post Malone and Tyler, The Creator. Many surrounding streets will be closed through Sunday night.

The Sun-Times will be there all four days covering the big shows and big crowds. Keep this page bookmarked for updates throughout the festival.

Set reviews

DAY 1: Miley Cyrus, Black Pumas, Orville Peck, Playboi Carti, Jimmy Eat World

Starting her Lollapalooza headlining set with “We Can’t Stop” (preaching the general theme of “it’s my party and I’ll do what I want to”), Miley Cyrus set the tone early on: It would be one helluva time and she would be making all the rules. In following those two tenets, the genre-bending star dominated the festival’s opening night.

There were fireworks, some memorable covers, a motley crew of guests, moments of nearly flashing the videofeed cameras, and the artist taking a stand on the important of freeing Britney Spears. During Cyrus’ performance Thursday of her hit “SMS (Bangerz),” which features Spears, the jumbo screens next to the stage broadcast the trending #freebritney message superimposed with caricatures of handcuffs. (Cyrus recently championed Spears’ conservatorship emancipation at a show in Vegas too.)

Read all of Selena Fragassi’s reviews from Thursday here.

Photo highlights

DAY 1: Sights and sounds from Thursday

Miley Cyrus performs at the T-Mobile stage, Thursday, July 29, 2021.
Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

Black Pumas performs at the T-Mobile stage, Thursday.
Black Pumas performs at the T-Mobile stage, Thursday.
Tyler LaRiviere/Sun-Times

Check out more sights and sounds captured by our photographers on the first day of Lolla here.

Lightfoot takes the stage: ‘Thank you for masking up and vaxing up’

Mayor Lori Lightfoot, who has been outspoken about her decision to keep Lollapalooza as scheduled despite the uptick in cases of COVID-19 and numerous variants spreading around the country, made a not-so-surprise appearance on the festival’s opening day.

Wearing a Black Pumas T-shirt, she introduced the group’s midday set at the T-Mobile Stage and hailed the Pumas as one of the greatest rock bands of today.

“The rate of vaccination in this crowd is off the charts,” she said.

Read the full story here.

First Lolla fans optimistic as 2021 festival kicks off amid COVID-19 precautions

Thousands of fans streamed into Grant Park Thursday marking the return of Lollapalooza after COVID-19 halted last year’s iteration of the 30-year-old music festival. While some fans said they were slightly worried about COVID-19, many expressed confidence in Lollapalooza’s new protocols.

But not everyone knew about the vaccine mandate in order to attend the music festival.

Read the full story here.

Lolla signs warn attendees they assume risk for COVID-19

The thousands of people entering Lollapalooza on Thursday are being greeted by signs explaining something that’s not included on their public health and safety website: By attending the festival, “you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19,” which they mention “can lead to severe illness and death.”

Read the full story here.

Must-see acts to check out

Some of the names on the Lolla lineup are a lot bigger than others. Selena Fragassi parses through the dozens of bands and artists to break down 10 must-see acts that attendees won’t want to miss this weekend. Here’s what Fragassi says about one of the festival’s earliest performers, Orville Peck:

No one exactly knows who this incognito Canadian country singer is (his trademark look is a long, fringed mask and cowboy hat) but the boudoir-looking John Wayne has heaped tons of due praise in his few years on the scene. Both for crafting a highly contagious psychedelic outlaw sound that refreshes the genre and for being an LGBTQ iconoclast whose work with Trixie Mattel and Gaga will soon put him in a new league.

Check out all of our recommended shows here.

How to watch performances live online

Unlike past years, Hulu is the exclusive live streaming partner for Lollapalooza 2021. All Hulu subscribers will be able to watch live performances for free as part of their subscriptions. Complete streaming schedules for all four days are already up on Hulu’s website, although they warn that set times are subject to change.

How will COVID-19 affect the festival?

With coronavirus case figures rising across the country amid lagging vaccination rates and the emergence of the Delta variant, Lollapalooza put in place security measures to help make the festival safer.

For those attending the festival, a vaccination card or proof of negative COVID-19 test will be required for entry. Get more information on how that’ll work here.

Chicago’s top health official, Dr. Alison Arwady, said Tuesday that the city’s virus situation is in “good control” ahead of the festival. However, Mayor Lori Lightfoot said recently that she would not hesitate to impose measures in Chicago such as face covering requirements if the city’s daily caseload keeps rising — and Arwady said she expects “some cases” of COVID-19 to result from the festival being held.

Lineup and schedule

Complete daily schedules for Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday can be found here.

The after-show lineup includes Modest Mouse, Journey, Jimmy Eat World and Freddie Gibbs. Check out the complete list of official Lolla after-shows here.

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